Home » Called Back. By Hugh Conway. With Sketch Of The Life Of The Author by Frederick John Fargus
Called Back. By Hugh Conway. With Sketch Of The Life Of The Author Frederick John Fargus

Called Back. By Hugh Conway. With Sketch Of The Life Of The Author

Frederick John Fargus

Published February 1st 2012
ISBN : 9781459039896
Paperback
112 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1885. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XV. FROM GRIEF TO JOY Y tale isMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1885. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XV. FROM GRIEF TO JOY Y tale is drawing to an end, although I could, for my own pleasure, write chapter after chapter, detailing every occurrence of the next month--describing every look, repeating every word that passed between Pauline and myself, but if I wrote them they would be sacred from all persons save two--my wife and myself. If my situation was an anomalous one it had at least a certain charm. It was a new wooing, none the less entertaining and sweet because its object happened to be already my wife in name. It was like a landowner walking over his estate and in every direction finding unsuspected beauties and unknown mines of wealth. Every day showed me fresh charms in the woman I loved. Her smile was a joy greater than I had ever pictured, her laugh a revelation. To gaze into those bright unclouded eyes and strive to learn their secrets was a reward that repaid me for all that I suffered. To find that her intellect, now restored, was fit to be matched with anyones--to know that when the time came I should be given not only a wife, beautiful, in my eyes, above all women, but a companion and a sympathetic friend--how can I describe my rapture? Yet it was a rapture not unmodified by doubts and fears. It may be that my character lacked that very useful trait called by some self-confidence and by others conceit. The more I saw to love and admire in Pauline, the more I asked myself how I could dare to expect that so peerless a creature would condescend to accept the love and the life I wished to offer her. Who was I to win her? I was rich, it is true, but I felt sure that riches would not buy her affection--besides, as I had not told her that her own wealth was swept away, she fancied her fortune was as large as my own. She was young, beau...